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Rights Enabled: The Disability Revolution, from the Us, to Germany and Japan, to the United Nations

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Rights Enabled: The Disability Revolution, from the Us, to Germany and Japan, to the United Nations

Rights Enabled: The Disability Revolution, from the Us, to Germany and Japan, to the United Nations
2015 | ISBN-10: 0472072471, 0472052470 | 256 pages | PDF | 3 MB

Drawing on extensive fieldwork and a variety of original sources, Katharina C. Heyer examines three case studies - Germany, Japan, and the United Nations - to trace the evolution of a disability rights model from its origins in the U.S. through its adaptations in other democracies to its current formulation in international law. She demonstrates that although notions of disability, equality, and rights are reinterpreted and contested within various political contexts, ultimately the result may be a more robust and substantive understanding of equality. Rights Enabled is a truly interdisciplinary work, combining sociolegal literature on rights and legal mobilization with a deep cultural and sociopolitical analysis of the concept of disability developed in Disability Studies. Heyer raises important issues for scholarship on comparative rights, the global reach of social movements, and the uses and limitations of rights-based activism.

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